The largest aircraft in the world was destroyed on Sunday by the Russian military battling on an airfield near Kyiv, Ukraine’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dmytro Kuleba, said, as Moscow continued its attack on its neighbour during the fourth day of its invasion.

AN-225 ‘Mriya’, which means ‘Dream’ in Ukrainian– was manufactured by Ukrainian aeronautics company Antonov, and qualified as the world’s largest cargo aircraft before it was reportedly burned at Hostomel Airport outside of Kyiv due to Russian shelling.

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Meanwhile, Ukraine, while taking to Twitter to mourn the destruction of the aircraft, tweeted, “The biggest plane in the world “Mriya” (The Dream) was destroyed by Russian occupants on an airfield near Kyiv. We will rebuild the plane. We will fulfill our dream of a strong, free and democratic Ukraine.”

Alongside the tweet, Ukraine’s handle posted a picture of the plane with a caption that read: “They burned the biggest plane, but our Mriya will never perish.”

Kuleba has echoed a similar sentiment online. “This was the world’s largest aircraft, AN-225 ‘Mriya’ (‘Dream’ in Ukrainian). Russia may have destroyed our ‘Mriya’. But they will never be able to destroy our dream of a strong, free and democratic European state. We shall prevail!” as per the tweet of the Foreign Minister.

As per Antonov, “It cannot confirm what the present condition of the plane is: “Currently, until experts have inspected the AN-225, we cannot report on the technical condition of the aircraft. Stay tuned for the further official announcement, tweeted the aircraft manufacturing company.

Russia has been bursting cruise missiles on several Ukrainian cities ever since it calls full-scale military operation of the nation on Thursday.

Street fights have also raged in Kharkiv on Sunday, during which the Ukraine forces have managed to take back control of the city from the Russian military, who have earlier pierced through their defences.

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