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Buckingham Palace banned ethnic minorities from office roles!

Buckingham palace

In a recent announcement by Buckingham palace, there were no colored immigrants or foreigners in a clerk position in the royal household in the late 1960s. According to the newly discovered documents from the palace will reignite the racial discrimination existing in the royal family.

These records also shed enlightenment on how the palace negotiated with controversial clauses. The Queen and her in-laws are exempted from any racial discrimination and sex discrimination.

National archives discovered these documents in the ongoing investigation by Guardian for using arcane parliamentary procedure also known as Queen’s consent.

The ban existed in the royal household. The law banned people belonging to ethnic minorities from working for clerical positions where there was no senior position. The discovery was just after the accusations of Duke and Duchess of Sussex. The couple believes that there is racial and sex discrimination in the royal society.

Queen consent is the procedure where parliament needs permission to debate the bill that will affect the crown. It will also affect the property and revenue of the royal family.

The Queen’s chief financial manager informed civil servants that “it was not, in fact, the practice to appoint coloured immigrants or foreigners” to clerical roles in the royal household. However, they have permit to work as domestic servants.

It is not clear if this practice is still followed or not. When this system concluded, and Buckingham palace refuses to comment further on this issue. Records also show that ethnic groups and minorities were staff members in 1990. But there was no record as back as 1990 to know the origin of these practices.

The Government minister would refuse to employ any ethnic group members. These exemptions made it impossible for women to raise their voices against this discrimination. This revelation will focus on the royal family’s historical and current status on racial discrimination and equality.